Issue 48

Acid Whey

Acid whey is a big dipper thanks to new protein solution

Arla Foods Ingredients has developed a protein solution that enables manufacturers to make delicious high-protein low-fat dips using the acid whey they have left over after making Greek yogurt.

It’s estimated that Greek yogurt manufacturers in the US generate about 1 million tonnes of acid whey every year. But simply by adding Arla Foods Ingredient’s unique Nutrilac® whey protein to a mixture of acid whey, water and cream, dairy companies can create a high quality dip that is typically only 6% fat and contains 4% protein.

The finished product is very stable with a shelf life of about six months, and offers a smooth and creamy mouthfeel with a fresh, clean flavor that is easily enhanced with sweet or savory inclusions.The dip is perfect for snacking occasions and for ‘nibbles’ before dinner parties.

By using their acid whey rather than disposing of it, dairy companies will enhance their environmental credentials and convert what would otherwise be a waste stream into a high value product that will generate incremental sales.

Torben Jensen, Category Manager for Fresh Dairy Products at Arla Foods Ingredients, said: “Acid whey continues to be a burden for manufacturers of Greek yoghurt products, and dairies are facing pressure to make sure it isn’t allowed to pollute the environment. Nutrilac® offers another option that makes it easy to make good use of acid whey and increase sales at the same time. Dairy dips are popular with consumers and, with its low fat content, this concept taps into demand for healthier products.”

Arla Foods Ingredients will launch its new acid whey dip concept on Booth 4121 at IFT Food Expo, which takes place in Chicago from 12-14 July 2015. As well as dips, Arla Foods Ingredients also offers whey protein solutions that enable dairy companies to turn their acid whey into beverages, desserts and spreadable cheese.

For every 100kg of milk used to make Greek yogurt, only 33kg ends up used in the final product. The remaining two-thirds is acid whey, a by-product that producers often dispose of in their waste stream – a solution that has caused widespread controversy on environmental grounds.